Monday, December 21, 2009

Kilombero valley/ Ifakara waterbird count

Hi Neil,

Is there anybody familiar with the Kilombero valley/ Ifakara area - I am think a waterbird count on the 1st in that area?

Regards,

Riaan Marais

***
Hi Riaan,
Several of us familiar with the Ifakara / Kilombero valley but no resident birders that I'm aware of. Wilbard, you are the only person I know actually working on birds in the valley these days. Please call Riaan on 0787-272818 if you want to join him on this count.

Trev, who's at the Udzungwa monitoring centre these days ? name and contact phone number please, they might be interested in joining Riaan.

Riaan, some counting can be done from high points but really this count needs boats along the river and this can be tough as one cannot see above the bank. However even a few kms either side of the ferry / bridge at Kivokoni would be useful. Upstream more important than downstream, if the latter you will need clearance from Wildlife Division to reach as far as Boma Ulanga ranger post where Pel's Fishing Owl is well worth looking for. If you want to do this then let me know and we will liaise with WD for permissions. Might be more rewarding to count past the ranger post into the Selous than to return and then go upstream from Kivokoni.

Will you have 2 days available ?

If water levels low then White-headed Plover and Skimmer are target birds, if high and flooding in the valley then count what you can from the causeway and consider trying to reach Lake Mofu. I can give you GPS fixes for these places.

If this in on I will send you the results form the 1995 and 2005 count.

Hope you can organise Dar north with Tony and John, some great wader and tern birding along that stretch of coast and it looks as though the spoonbills (target species) are beginning to nest on Pangavini.

Neil




Mob : +255 767 272 818

A Land Rover doesn't leak oil, it marks it's territory!!

Saturday, December 19, 2009

Denham's Bustard in the Southern Highlands



Further to that recent remarkable record of 3 birds on Kisolanza we have a report of 3 birds on Mutanga Farm (but one has been eaten we think) south of Kilolo (new District headquarters) on the Mtitu River and.........

This beauty was taken last night on short grass orchid meadows downs due north of the farm. Habitat that is under extreme pressure, quite amazing what's hanging in there. This is our first record from this square.

Our guys have ringed 25 Mountain Marsh Widows and 2 Blue Swallows (3 pairs close to camp) and have a Red-chested Flufftail close to camp. Lots more to come from this site including some great breeding data.

Neil

Friday, December 18, 2009

News on Beesley's Lark

Zenan

Fantastic news about Beesleys, perhaps after the Manyara count we can organise an even better survey of this very rare lark as we also have to search west of the road, John Beesley's original site and where we have seen it once.

Please talk to Kapanya on 0784-772688 or 0767-772688 and to Furaha on 0754-573979 to fully involve your team in the waterbird count. KK will have transport and Furaha is familiar with counting techniques / procedures so it's important they organise this with you. You all need to sit and discuss what is possible.

Duluti not so important (and your Madagascar Squacco almost certainly just Common Squacco, esp at this time of the year when mad squacs back on their breeding grounds) and easy to count but still worth the effort. Good site for training and to begin with in January.

Arusha NP far more important, esp the EXACT number of Maccoa Ducks so every bay on Momella lakes just to make sure. So both Duluti and Arusha NP in one day please then......

Eluanata (See IBA book) (ask Daudi for the name he uses for this dam) also important, esp for Maccoa Ducks as this is on route to....

Burunge, this lake esp important if there are large numbers of Greater Flamingo (if there are lots count them carefully as this is a target species). It would also be good to know if the Blacksmith Plover numbers are still around 1,000.

and then, if you have time and there are enough of you with 2 vehicles you could count as much as possible of the Tarangire River. If you think this is possible we will discuss with TANAPA and arrange for permission to drive along the river bank.

KK, do you have a GPS ?

keep talking and planning.

EVERYONE IS INVITED TO MANYARA ON THE 31ST.... Training in counting techniques and identification of difficult waders and, if we have enough transport we will attempt a total one day count of Manyara. This has never been attempted before and it will be difficult. 50 good observers should do it so karibuni wote.

Neil

----- Original Message -----
From: zenana gasper mwacha
January 2010 waterbird counts



Neil!
I've been out for the while,
I would like to participate fo Manyara,Duluti or Serengeti.
One news from the lark plain Dec 13-16 Hassani and Elfeo from
Olasiti Birding Club were able to count 37 Chersomanes beesleyi - at Lark plain.
Many cattles,sheep and goat were moved out from the plain
and some died due to drough leaving the beesleys in at least condition..
Because it was too dry and hot during the dry season insects
congregated undernearth cow dungs & herbivores dropings for shed and moisture.The beesleys were successfully feeding on them.[mostly bettles types.]
Hassani and Elfeo were doing field practice on survival course and voluntered
to walk the entire lark plain.They biked all the way up there, did local camps and ate local food after interacting with some maasai people.

Dec.22-24 lake Duluti after one hour and a half canoing
70 long t commorants
60 lesser commorants
4 giant kingfishers
8 pied kingfishers
62 common s. herons
4 streated herons
2 greater egrets
1 little egret
1 dwarf heron
2 black h.heron
2 madagascar s.heron
etc

Momella Lakes in Arusha NP




I was at Momella Lakes in Arusha NP last weekend. I was soon
overwhelmed trying to count the flamingos (I've counted thousands of
auks on cliff ledges from a bobbing boat before, but these flamingos,
they're so mobile, they're a nightmare!). So I decided to take a
panoramic series of photos of the whole lot as I moved around the
lake, thinking that physical features on the bank behind would be
adequate to help avoid double-counting when stitching the photos
together later. I've attached an example photo; of course all the
originals are much bigger in size and higher in quality.

Firstly, would you comment on the validity/accuracy of counting them
in this way. And secondly, since it's hard to find the time to
actually sit down and do the counting, I was wondering if there is
anyone out there who would be willing to help? i.e. I can send anyone
the whole series of photos if they have a good connection and enjoy
this sort of thing...

I've attached a couple of other photos for fun

Cheers
Trev

p.s. >99% of them were lessers, I guess this is normal
p.p.s. Couldn't find a single maccoa, maybe I don't know where to look...

Mystery Cisticola in Katavi





I came across a Cisticola sp. I was not familiar with yesterday – see images attached.



On first impression, it looked large, very chunky with a heavy bill, and mostly grey apart from startling white throat and supercillium, in front of the eye only. The head seemed to have little in the way of warm tones. In flight it looked very similar a weaver (i.e fast and direct) when it also showed a short tail.



I first saw two birds together and was completely stumped, and they didn’t call at all. Luckily I came across another pair 1-2km away and this time they were calling. I remembered it as “TU-tweeee” the latter note long and rising, which was repeated several times.



When I got back to camp, I checked F&S and although the plates weren’t much help, the text suggested that the call is a good fit for Chirping Cisticola. The distribution notes say it’s meant to occur at “Mumba stream” only in SW TZ. We’re not far from a place called Mamba (maybe the same?) so maybe this is just a small leap for them if they are coming in from Zambia?

maybe this is a familiar bird to you?


Cheers and best,



Adam Kennedy

Thursday, December 17, 2009

Raptors in Moshi




Dear Liz & Neil,

Nice to get back to you with some news! We hope you are keeping well!

We are back in Spain after our trip to Kenya-Tanzania...we had to sort out many things there but we had also some chances to go birding. It was great!! We have seen some interesting sightings for us that you may like to know about, like the Western Banded Snake Eagle that we (with James and Geoff) saw in TPC Moshi the 28th of October, on the same day we had a long time to observe a couple of Temminck´s Stints. Geoff and I went on the 15th of November to Arusha NP and have taken some pics of what we think is a Long-legged Buzzard...amazingly long wings!

We attach some of the pics and I will send you the full lists another day.We are having cold and maybe white Xmas this year (0 C today)...we wish you both and family a very Happy Xmas and New Year!!!

Geoff & Anabel

Hi Anabel

Happy to hear you enjoyed the visit.

These dry season Western Banded Snake Eagles in the East are really interesting and almost certainly regular visitors.

I had my first at TPC in the early 80s, then again on the upper Pangani (with a Southern Banded !!) in the mid 90s and one on SW KIli in the early 00s. They are regular in the dry Ruaha Gorge between Iringa and Mikumi but always in low numbers, just odd birds.

The nearest breeding population in the north is on Rubondo Island and in the south perhaps Katavi.

Long-legged Buzzards are more frequently recorded these days due in a large part to the improved quality of the books but can still cause problems. Not easy to see the tail pattern (an important feature) on your bird but for sure those wings are long enough. Let's see what others think.


Neil

Wednesday, December 16, 2009

Olive-flanked Robin Chat (Cossypha anomala mbuluensis)

Link to soundfile:

HTML versjon (14k)

Hi all

One for the archives from Bob Sternstedt. not so many of us have seen / heard this bird. Louis..is it being split ?

Neil

Temminck's Stint in Katavi


Hi All,

Seen with a Little Stint nearby yesterday at Hippo Pools close to Ikuu
ranger post. See pic attached.

I'm guessing there's not too many records this far south Neil?

Cheers

Adam

Photo: Adam Kennedy

Thursday, December 10, 2009

Crowned Eagle


Just further to the crowned eagle discussion. We are currently monitoring a nest (see attached image) on Mt Rungwe, as we did last year. This started out as a means of determining how many primates and which spp (including kipunji) these birds take. Of course it became more interesting than that. Last year they were bringing in genets, hyrax, chameleons and even landsnails. This year, the eggs have not yet hatched, but we'll keep you posted.
Tim

Sunday, December 6, 2009

Rufiji Delta waterbird count

Hi all

I'm just entering data from a 20 day count in the Rufiji Delta in December 2000 that I suspect is not in the literature. Olivier, your tech report 24.

You never did write up that Kelp Gull !!!!!!!!!!!!

While tough to work this is surely a place to spend a couple of weeks in a well kitted out camp (cold beers essential in that heat) with two decent boats.

highlights from this December count include

Curlew Sandpiper 16,043
Crab Plover 3,402
Terek Sandpiper 2,884
Gull-billed Tern 3,427
Lesser Crested Tern 1,939
Caspian Tern 173
Eurasian Curlew 265
Pink-backed Pelican 286
Dimorphic Egret 246
White-fronted Sandplover 347

Neil

Friday, December 4, 2009

Wildlife trade raping Africa


I don't suppose the RSPB or Birdlife will want to read this. I wrote to the RSPB in 1983 suggesting there was a problem with bird exports from Tanzania.... 25 years of doing nothing, zillions of dead birds later. In 93 at the Rossenheim conference that brought BL into being any talk of trade was quickly squashed, the good guys on the RSPB team were not even allowed to officially talk about it. The theme was, let's be nice to governments and then they will listen to us... how naive can one get yet this sort of PC thinking still dominates the conservation movement. Children at play.


Neil

thanks Clive for passing this one along. Photo: Wildlife Extra
See whole article here;
http://www.wildlifeextra.com/do/ecco.py/view_item?listid=22&listcatid=251&listitemid=6132&live=0&utm_campaign=African%20wildlife%20for%20sale%3B%20Leucistic%20opossum%20%26%20shearwater%3B%20Saiga%3B%20Gorilla%20baby.&utm_content=clivefmann@gmail.com&utm_medium=Email&utm_source=VerticalResponse&utm_term=CLICK%20HERE.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Wildlife trade raping Africa – Hundreds of species for sale on the internet

02/12/2009 14:54:25

Secretaty birds are listed for sale at $2000. Credit Wildlife Extra

$1,500 for a Zebra - Nile monitor $10 - Secretary bird $2000
November 2009. We were recently approached by a Tanzanian wildlife dealer, offering us an eye-wateringly wide range of species. Although it is not currently legal to import wild birds into the UK (This was not implemented with any thought for wildlife, but because of bird flu.), it is still legal in many countries. We were shocked and amazed by the species that are available.

When we followed up by feigning interest in buying some of the species, by questioning how it was possible to get export licences for some of these species. The wildlife trader who approached us assured us that "In our country there is no problem, all things are possible. If you are sure to get import permit in your country for that species, we can do business without any problem, we need to be serious both of us. If you will provide money I will do whatever you want me to do."


Zebra are offered for $1500.
Untrustworthy and criminal

One consolation was that while looking for more information, we found a website forum for wildlife traders and buyers. Almost the whole forum is taken up with people slagging each other off, either for not providing the goods even though they had been paid, or for not paying once they had received the goods. Wildlife Extra was delighted to read what an untrustworthy bunch both sides of this equation are.

BIRDS for sale

African darter - Anhinga rufa $100
African fish eagle - haliaeetus ocifer $600
Augur buzzard - buteo rufofuscus $1800
Abdimin stork - ciconia abdimii $90
African citril - serinus citrinelloed $2.50
African golden oriole - oriolus auratus $15
African hoopoe - upapa epops africana $50
African spoonbill - platalea alba $80
African jacana - actophilornis africanus $10
Bateleur - terathopius ecaudatus $10
Barefaced go away bird - corythaixoides personata $20
Black crake - limnocorax flavirostra $ 20
Black and white mannkin - poensis $1
Black faced waxbill - estrilda erythronotos $2
Blacksmith plover vanellus armatus $15
Black headed oriole - oriolus larvatus $20
Black winged bishop -euplectes hordeacea $1.50
Black capped - uraeginthus cyanocephalus $1.50
Blue naped mousebird- urocolius macrourus $4
Cardinal quelea - quelea cardinalis $1
Carmine Bee-eater- merops nubicus $15
Cattle egret -bubulcus ibis $30
Chestnut banded sandplover-charadrius pallidus $20
Cinammon - breasted rock buntingemberiza tahapisi$1.50
Commonwaxbill - Estrilda astrild $1
Creasted Guinea fowls - guttera edouardi $40
Crimson rumped waxbill- Estrilda rhodopyga $ 1.50
Crowned plover - vanellus coronatus $15
Crowned crane - Balearia regulorum $500
Coqi francolin - francollinus coqui $50
Cult - throat - Amadina fasciata $2.50
Darnauds Barbet - Trachyphonus darnaudii $5
Emerald spotted wood dove- turtur chalcospilos $5
Egyptian goose alopochen aegyptiacus $40
Golden - breasted bunting - Emberiza flaviventris $2
Golden - breasted stalling - cosmopsarus regius $15
Greater flamingo - phoenicopterus rubber $220
Green pigeon - treron australis $10
Green backed twinsport - mandingoa nitidula $4
Green winged pytilia - pytilia melba $2.50
Grey headed silverbill - odontospiza canicepsi $2
Grey headed social weaver - pseudonigrita arnaudi $2.50
Ground hornbill - bucorvus leadbeateri $220
Goliath heron - ardea goliath $300
Hamerkop - scopus umbretta $35
Hartiaubs Turaco - tauraco hartlaubi $30
Helmeted Guineafowl - Numida meleagris $50
Hadada ibis - hagedashia hagedash $80
Indian house crow - corvus spelendenens $20
Sacred ibis - threskiornis aethiopicus $30
Kori bustard - ardeotis kori $600
Laughing dove - streptopelia senegalensis $15
Lesser bustard - $200

Lesser flamingo - phoenicopterus monor $120
Lilac-breasted roller -coracias caudata $15
Living stone turaco - tauraco livingstonii $30
Long tailed crmorant- phalacrocorax africunus $60

Martial eagle - polemaetus bellicosus $2600


Marabou stork - leptoptilos crumeniferus $250
Montane white - eyes - zosterops poliogaster $3
Mourning dove - streptopelia decipiens $5
Namaqua dove - oena capensis $5
Nubian vulture - torgos tracheliotus $2000
Open bill stork - anastomus lamellilgerus $80
Paradise whydah - steganura paradisaea $2
Peters Twinsport - hypargos niveoguttatus $5
Pied crow - corvus albus $25
Pin-tailed whydah - vidua macroura $3
Purple grenadier - uraenginthus ianthionogaster $5
Quallfinch - ortygospiza atricol $3
Red-and yellow barbet - trachyphonus erythocephalus $7
Red - billed firefinch- lagonosticta senegala $3
Red billed teal - anas erythrorhyncha $25
Red bishop - euplectes orix $2.50
Red cheeked cordonblue - uraeginthus bengalus $3.50
Red cheeked spurfowl- francolinus afer $40
Red knobbed coot- fulica cristata $20
Ring necked dove-streptopeliacapicola $25
Rufous crowned roller- coracias naevia $25
Saddlebill stork - ephippiorhynchus $ 850
Secretary bird- sagittarius serpentarius $2000
Silverbill -euodice malabarica $5
Silvery cheeked hornbill -bycanistes brevis $ 30
Speckeled fronted weaver- sporopipes flontaris $3.50
Speckle mousebird - colius striatus $80
Spotted egle owl- bubo africanus $80
Spur winged goose- plectropterus gambensis $40
Squacco heron- ardeola ralloides $40
Standard winged night ja- macrodipteryx longipennis$20
Steel - blue whydah - vidua hypocherina $2
Straw -tailed whydah - vidua hypocherina $2
Straw - tailed whydah - vidua fischeri $3.50
Streakey seedeaater - serinus striolatus $7
Super starling- spreo superbus $30
Trumpeter hornbill- bycanistes bucinator $50
Tambourine dove- bycanistes bucinator $8000
Vulturine guineafowl - acryllium vulturinum $30
Whale headed stork-balaeniceps rex $45
Watted starling- creatophora cinerea $55
Wattled ibis - canary - serinus dorsotritus $2.50
Whitebilled - go- away - corythaixoides leucogaster $20
White faced whistling duck - dendrocygna viduata $20
White pelecan - pelecanus onocrotalus $130
Woolly necked stork- ciconia episcopis $90
Yellow billed stork - mycteria ibis $100
Yellow bishop - euplectes capensis $3.50
Yellow billed - waxbill - estrilda melanotis $3.50
Yellow fronted canary - serinus mozambicus $3.50
Yellow - rumped seed-eater-serinus atrogularis $3.50
Yellow - sholdered widowbird-euplectes macrocercus $3
Yellow necked spurfowl francolin $30
Yellow throated sand grouse pterocles gutturalis $20
Zanzibar red bishop- euplectus 2.50

MAMMALS:

Bush pig Potamochoerus porcus $1,000
Plain Zebra Equus burchellii $1,500
Smith Bush squirrel Paraxerus cepapi $100
Ground squirrel Paraxerus ochraceus $100
Tree squirrel Paraxerus ochraceus $100
South African crested porcupine Hystrixafricae-australis$300
North-African crested porcupine Hystrix cristata $280
Spring Hare Pedetes capensis $200
Spotted hyena Crocuta crocuta $1000
African Wild cat Felis silvestris $350
Serval cat Felis serval $4000
Small spotted genet Geneta tigena $300
Rusty spotted genet Geneta tigrina $400
East African civet civettictis civetta $300
Four toed hedgehog erinaceuse albirentris $50
Rock hyrax Procavia capensis $250
Tree hyrax Dendrohyrax capensis $250
Elephant shrew Elephantus brachyhyncus $250
Dwarf mongoose Helogale parvula $250
White tailed mongoose Ichneumia albicauda $350
Banded mongoose Mungos mungo $350
Ratel/Honey badger Mallivora capensis $600
Zorila Ictonyx striatus $1,000
Cape clawsless otter Aonyx capensis $1,200
Spotted-necked otter Lutra macullicolis $1000
Cane rat Phrynomys imhaus $200
Aardvark orycteropus cafer $3500
Vervet monkey $150
Blue monkey $250
Yellow baboon Papio anubis $400
Olive baboon papio cynocephalus $400
Impala aephyceros melampus $300
Tomson's Gazelle gazella thomsonii $300
Grant gazelle gazelle granti $450
Widebeest connnochaetes taurinus $800
Kirki's Dik-dik madoqua kirkii $200
Common duiker sylvicapra grimmia $380
African clawless otter Aonyx capensis $800

INSECTS

Centipedes
Garden centipede (Lithobius forticatus) $3
Centipede (Necrophloephagus flavus) $3
Giant peruvian (Scolopendra gigantea) $4
Home centipede (Scutigera coleoptrata) $3
Flat centipede $3
Red headed centipede (Scolopendridae family) $3
Flag tail centipede $4
Yellow legged centipede $3
Assorted centipede $2.50
Millipedes
Black giant $2
Black millipedes $2
Chocolate legged $2
Fire millipedes $3
Green body millipede $3
Pink body $2.50
Pinky legged $2
Red body $2
Red-legged millipedes $3
Small black $2
Small yellow stripped $2
Tanzania bill bug $3
White legged $2
Yellow-legged millipede $2
Grass Hoppers chorthippus spp $4
Common large grasshopper anthracis ruficornis $4
Dictyphorus spumans (order must exceed 60hds) $10
Lubber grasshopper - brachystola magna $5
Melanoplus bivittatus $3
Phymateus leprosus $4
Phymateus morbillosus $4
Phymateus morbillosus $3
Short horned G. Hopper - acrida bicolor $2
Short horned G. Hopper acrida spp $3
Zonocerus elegans $5

MANTIDS
African flower mantis - Pseudocreobroter spp $2
African giant mantis $3
Idolomantis- $20
African mantis - sphodromantis lineola $3
African twig mantis - Popa spurca $3
Parasphendale affinis $4
Sphofromantis centralis $3

SCORPIONS
African black scorpion-pandinus africanus $2
Assorted scorpions $2
Common earwig-Frticular auricularia $3
East African Spitting scorpion $4
Emperor scorpions -pandinus imperator $2
Flat back scorpion- centuroides gracilis $4
Flat rock scorpion-Hedogenes troglodytes $3
Giant black scorpion- heterometrus longimanus $5
Hotenttotta trilineatus $5
Red claw scorpion- pandinus cavimanus $4
Tail less whip scorpion - damon variegates $5
Tanzania spitting scorpion- parabuthus liosoma $4
Water scorpion $5
Yellow banded flat rock- Bufoalvarius $3
Jav forest scorpion - hetrometrus javnensis $4
Thai black scorpion- hetermetrus spinifer $5
Red burrowing scorpion- opistophthalmus glbrifrons

SPIDERS
African giant baboon spider hysterocrates spp $10
Black tarantula plerinochilus spp $5
Black trapdoor spider stassimopus roberti $6
Daddy long leg pholcus phalangioides $3
Garden spider araneus spp $3.50
Grey baboon spider selonocosmia spp $5
Hairy legged spider stromatopelma calceata $6
House spider amaurobius similis $4
Kilimanjaro spider plerinochilus weidenmanni $6
King baboon spider citharischius crawshayi $10
Orange baboon spider selonocosmia javanensis $6
Pink toe like avicularia $8
Red devil spider $6
Red trapdoor spider gorgyrella spp $5
Water spider oryronetidae family $5

REPTILES


GECKOS
Clawed gecko = holodactylus africanus usd $2
Bibron's thick-toed gecko =pachydactilus bibronii usd $2
Tete thick-toed gecko = pachydactilus tetensis $2
Angulated dwarf gecko = lygodactylus angularis $2.50
Cape dwarf gecko = lygodactylus angularis $2.50
Yellow headed dwarf gecko = lygodatylus luteopicturatus $2.50
Green day gecko =phelsuma dubia $4
Teopical house gecko = hemidactylus mabouia $2
Usambara forest gecko = chemaspis africana $2
Mwanza rock agama = agama mwanzae $2.50
Red headed rock agama agama agama $2.50
Eastern tropical spiny agama= agama aculeata $2.50

CHAMELEONS
Common flap necked chameleon- chamaeleo dilepsi $8
Gracile chameleon - chamaeleo gracilis $8
Giant one horned chameleon -chamaeleo melleri $30
Side striped chameleon - chamaeleo bitaeniatus $8
Rwenzori side striped chameleon- chamaeleo rudis $ 8
Meru three horned chameleon --chamaeleo jacksoni merumontana $45
Weners three honed chameleon- chameleo werneri = $10
Usambara three horned chameleon- chamaeleo deremensis $ 30
Fischers two horned chameleon- bradypodion fischeri $6
Bearded pigmy chameleon-rhampholeleo brevicaudas $4.50
Taveta 2 horned chameleon-bradypodion tavetanum $7
Kenya pigmy chameleon - rhampoloen kerstenii $3.50
Speckled lipped skink - mabuya maculilabris $2.50
Short necked skink - mabuya previcolis $2
Long tail skink - mabuya planifrons $2.50
Southern skink - mabuya quinquetaniata $2.50
Variable skink - mabuya varia $2
Common striped skink - mabuya striata $2.50
Sundevalls writhing skink - lygosoma sundevalii $2
Peters writhing skink - lygosoma afer - $2.50
Teita limbless skink - acontias percivali $5
Bouleners s skink - mabuya boulengeri $2
Jacksons forest lizard - adolfus jacksoni $3
Eastern serrate toed tree agama - holaspis guentheri $2
Boulengers scrub lizard nucras boulengeri $3
Southern long tail lizard - latastia longicaudata $2

PLATED LIZARDS:
Southern tawny plated lizard - gerrhosaurus major $6
Black line plated lizard - gerrhosaurusnigrolineatus $6
Yellow throated plated lizard gerrhosaurus flavilaris $5
Eastern african spiny tailed lizard cordylus tropidosternum $4

MONITOR LIZARDS:
Nile monitor varanus niloticus $10
Southern savanna monitor - varanus albigularis $30
Eastern schlegels blin snake - typhlops schelegelii $15
African rock phython - python sebae natalensis $40
Puffadder - bitis arientas $70
Eastern gaboon viper -bitis gabonica $80
Greater lake bush viper - atheris nitschei $80
Snouted night adder - causus defilippii $40
Rhombic night adder - causus rhombeatus $25
Bibrons stilleto snake - atractaspis bibrionii $40
Egyptian cobra - naja haje haje $70
Forest cobra - naja melanoleuca $70
Black necked spitting cobra - naja nigricolis $60
Red spitting cobra naja pollida $100
Mozambique spitting cobra naja mossambica $100
Black mamba dendroaspis polylepis $100
Eastern green mamba dendroaspis angusticeps $100
Thirteen scaled snake philothamnus carinatus $20
Variable green snake philothamnus heterodernus $15
Southern green snake philothamnus hoplogaster $15
Batterbys green snake philothamnus angolensis $15
Angola green snake philothamnus angolensis $15
Ornaate green snake philothamnus ornatus $15
Slender green snake philothamnus heterolepidotus $10
Loveridges green snake philothamnus nitidus $10
Boomslang dispholidus typus $30
Common house snake dasypelties scabra $25
Common house snake lamprophis fuliginosus $25
Leopard tortoises $50
Pan cake tortoise $60
Aldabra tortoises $1500

FROGS AMPHIBIANS
Pigmy leaf folding frog afrixalus pygmaeus $2.50
Fornasini's leaf frog afrixalus fornasinii $2.50
Golden sedge frog hyperolius punctulatus $2.50
Marbled reed frog hyperolius marmoratus $2.50
Viridiflavian reed frog hyperolius viridiflavus $2
Bubbling kassina kassina senegalisis $2.50
Colored reed frog large hyperolius $2
Argus tree frog hyperolius argus $2.50
Tiniker tree frog hyperoliussp $2.50
Grey tree frog chiromantis xerampelina $2.50
Banaana tree frog ardeolia rallordes $2.50
Mascrene green frog pthchadena mascareniesis $2.50
Puddle frog phrynobatrachus natalensis $2.50
Pyxi bull frog phrynomerus bifasciatus $3.50
Red banded frog phrynomerus bifasciatus $2
Shovel nose frog hemisus marmoratum $2
Square marked frog bufo regularis $2
Large green tree frog chiromantis xeramphilina $2
Ornate frog hildebrandtia ornata $2
Jumping frog ptychadena spp $200
Forest tree frog leptopelis argenteus $2
Red legged kassina kassina maculat $2.50
Pfeffer's burrowing frog leptopeltis argenteus $2.50
Bocage's burrowing frog leptopelis bocagii $2.50
Hilderbrandt's burrowing frog hildabrandtia ornata $2.50
Dusky throated rana rana angolensis $2.50
Golden backed frog hylarana galamensis $2.50
Groove crowned bull frog rana occipitalis $2.50
Tremolo sand frog tomoptema tuberculosa $2.50
Mozambiqui rain frog breviceps mossambicus $2.50
Parkers reed frog hyperolius parkeri $2.50
Common toad bufo gutturalis $2.50
Red toed frog bufo carens $2.50
White foam nest tree frog chiromantis petersi $2.50
Long toed frog strongylopus fasciatus $2.50
Tuberculate sand frog temopterna tuberculosa $2
Transparent reed frog hyperolius pusillus $2
Red eyed yellow frog leptopelis spp $2
Ruby eyed tree frog leptopelis uluguruensis $3
African giant snail helix aspersa $5

Neil and Liz Baker, Tanzania Bird Atlas, P.O. Box 1605, Iringa, Tanzania.
Mobiles: 0776-360876 and 0776-360864.
http://tanzaniabirdatlas.com
Subscribe to: tanzaniabirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
__._,_.___

Wednesday, November 18, 2009

EA Bee-eaters

many thanks Don
Nobby, this should be in Scopus !!
yet another example where blood samples are vital if these basic questions are ever to be answered.

Neil

-
Subject: EA Bee-eaters


Dear Brian; The following may be of help in the very complex arrangement of Blue-breasted vs Cinnamon- chested Bee-eaters in East Africa, and whether our oreobates is in fact correctly named.
With very best wishes
Don Turner




Prior to Fry's major contribution on the evolution and systematics of bee-eaters (hereafter referred to as Fry 1969), it had been generally accepted by most authors including Jackson & Sclater (1938), Chapin (1939), Peters (1945), Boetticher (1951) and White (1965) that Merops oreobates (Sharpe 1892) was nothing more than a race of Merops lafresnayii Guérin-Méneville 1843.

However Grant & Mackworth-Praed (1937) had considered (on mainly morphological grounds) that lafresnayii more closely resembled Merops variegatus Vieillot than M.l.oreobates, and so proposed that lafresnayii be considered a race of variegatus, thus leaving oreobates a distinct monotypic species of the East African highlands. This position was later followed in Mackworth-Praed & Grant (1952) though clearly rejected by White (1965). More recently Fry (1984), Fry et al (1988) and Dickinson (2003) have all followed Grant & Mackworth-Praed (1937) and Fry (1969) in considering lafresnayii a race of variegatus.

Throughout the greater part of its range in West, Central and Eastern Africa variegatus is a bird of damp lowland grasslands and lakeside vegetation (Chapin 1939, Benson et al 1971, Britton 1980, Zimmerman et al 1996, Dowsett et al 2008), but the race bangweoloensis does reach 2000m in swampy areas of the Ufipa Plateau in sw Tanzania (D.Moyer & R.J.Dowsett pers.comm.). This is in direct contrast with oreobates which throughout its range is a montane species of open forest, forest edges and woodlands between 1600 and 2300m (Zimmerman et al 1996). In Ethiopia lafresnayii is largely confined to the Rift Valley and adjacent highlands, favouring a variety of forest habitats between 1200 and 3200m (Urban & Brown 1971).

Morphologically lafresnayii is intermediate between variegatus and oreobates, being closer to the former in colouration, but closer to the latter in size and choice of habitat. Vocalisations of lafresnayii are said to be identical with those of oreobates, and totally unlike variegatus (B.Finch pers. comm.). In Chappuis (2000) some calls of variegatus are either a rather hard "klup, klup" or slightly softer and more prolonged (as in the case of a pair displaying), in contrast to the calls of oreobates which are much higher pitched. Some years earlier Van Someren (1922) had commented that specimens of M.l.oreobates from the Turkwell (Gorge) area of nw Kenya were sometimes very like the Ethiopian birds, having the blue forehead and supercilium and blue neck-patch. Meanwhile recent photographs of birds in typical oreobates habitat taken at Malewa River Lodge at 2200m in the central Rift Valley of Kenya north of Lake Naivasha, and from the Kakamega Forest (alt. 1700m) in western Kenya show individuals with a prominent blue supercilium and in the case of the Malewa bird a bright violet-blue neck band.

Fry (1984) posed the question: "is the large blue-gorgeted bird in the highlands of Ethiopia (lafresnayii) conspecific with the large black-gorgeted one in the highlands further south (oreobates), or with the small blue-gorgeted one of neighbouring lowlands (variegatus). " Being clearly inclined to the latter view he felt that the two highland forms were independent derivatives of the lowland Blue-breasted Bee-eater (M.variegatus), the Ethiopian population more recently so than the East African form on account of it showing similar characters (colour of forehead, supercilium and neck band). Nevertheless Fry doubted that unanimity would ever be reached with this problem, and that further revision may be necessary in the future.

While it is likely that oreobates and lafresnayii are independently derived from variegatus, with components of variegatus appearing in both highland forms (not just lafresnayii as earlier thought by Grant & Mackworth-Praed and Fry), and with clear vocal and habitat differences between variegatus and the other two, the question that now arises is whether oreobates can be truly considered a monotypic species confined to the montane forests of Eastern Africa.


References:
Benson, C.W., Brooke, R.K., Dowsett, R.J. & Irwin, M.P.S. 1971. The Birds of Zambia. Collins.
London.
Boetticher, H. von, 1951. La systematique des Guepiers. L'Oiseau 5 (21): 194-199.
Britton, P.L. (Ed).1980. Birds of East Africa, their habitat, status & distribution. EANHS. Nairobi.
Chapin, J.P. 1939. The Birds of the Belgian Congo. Vol 2. Bull.Amer.Mus.Nat.Hist. 75: 1-632.
Chappuis, C. 2000. Oiseaux d'Afrique (African bird sounds), 2. West and Central Africa. (11 CDs).
Paris: Société d'Etudes Ornithologiques de France.
Dickinson, E.C.(Editor) 2003. The Howard & Moore Complete Checklist of the Birds of the World.
Third Edition. Christopher Helm. London.
Dowsett, R.J., Aspinwall, D., & Dowsett-Lemaire, F. 2008. The Birds of Zambia. An Atlas and
Handbook. Tauraco Press & Aves. Liege. Belgium.
Fry, C.H. 1969. The evolution and systematics of bee-eaters (Meropidae). Ibis 111: 557-592.
Fry, C.H. 1984. The Bee-eaters. T & A.D. Poyser, Calton, England.
Fry, C.H., Keith, S., & Urban, E.K.1988. The Birds of Africa. Vol 3. Academic Press. London.
Grant, C.H.B. & Mackworth-Praed, C.W.1937. On the relationship of Melittophagus variegatus
and Melittophagus lafresnayii. Bull. Br. Orn. Club 57: 129-130.
Jackson, F.J.J. & Sclater, W.L. 1938. The Birds of Kenya Colony and the Uganda Protectorate.
Gurney and Jackson. London.
Mackworth-Praed, C.W. & Grant, C.H.B.1952. African Handbook of Birds. Series 1. Eastern and
North-eastern Africa. Vol 1. Longmans. London.
Peters, J.L.1945. Check-list of Birds of the World. Volume 5. Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Urban, E.K. & Brown, L.H. 1971. A Checklist of the Birds of Ethiopia. Haile Sellassie Univ. Press.
Addis Ababa. Ethiopia.
Van Someren, V.G.L. 1922. Notes on the Birds of East Africa. Novitates Zool. 29: 1-246.
White, C.M.N. 1965. A revised check list of African Non-Passerine Birds. Govt. Printer. Lusaka.
Zimmerman, D.A., Turner, D.A. & Pearson, D.J. 1996. Birds of Kenya and Northern Tanzania.
A & C Black. London.

Monday, November 16, 2009

Olasiti Birding Club - cycling and birding excurtion


Dear all!

This is Zenan, a professional guide and a program manager for the Olasiti Orphans Center.

I'm in vacation this month, would like to share the little I have and to envite children and any interested person to participate on cycling and birding excution 7-10 days to Manyara region.We expect to do the great species count [flora and founa]on lake Burunge and on the Magara escarpments & forest.We dont use car support, we cary everything on bicycles and rely on our own land survival skills.This is our fourth charming and adventurous experdition.Around 10 orphans and vulnarable children from Olasiti are going to participate. We expect to cover around 500kms.3-4 days ride and 3-6 days excution in the forest.We expect the unexpected and we perceive any natural challenge as part of our life.
Our activities there will be birding and environmental studies.[ We will be stoping after each 50kms ride and do a 500m radious species count and we will observe best and bad practices done by different ethnic groups.I the final we will report.

We will plant tree seedlings if there will be good weather to schools and
> around people's homes.Once we get back we will plant tree seedlings to our homes too.[If conditions are favourable ie good weather]



Those who are not members of the Olasiti Birding Club needs to contribute for their own living expenses and emergency.People with abnomal health conditions are welcome but will be prohibited or given a limit practice to participate.We mostly need birders and specialized guides, wildlife managers or biologists,geologist and any related field to participate and share their experience voluntarly. [ If we can have a specialized Taxanomist on Botany we will appreciate!]

If some of you would like to participate please email us for more informations.

Cheers!

Zenan

Water Thicknee & Racket-tailed Roller



Hi Pietro

The white wingbar and the fine vermiculations (just dark feather shafts) on
the mantle make this a Water Thicknee Burhinus vermiculatus. Senegal shows
much darker feather centers on the mantle, more like a Spotted Thicknee.

This is the "normal" adult Racket-tailed Roller. Sadly Stevenson & Fanshawe
chose to illustrate the far rarer "form" "weigalli" (or something like that,
no books here on the beach in Dar.) which has a lilac breast and may
represent an imm plumage.

great pics, please send more ......

Neil

>>ciao Neil
>
> how are you?
> I hope everything is fine
>
> i wonder if you can help me
>
> I have a couple of questions about IDs
> I am sending you 2 pictures
> 1 Raquet tail Roller, Ruaha NP Miombo woodland most of the rollers i
> see there are this strange blue color on the chest. Some years ago
> Spike told me i is a blue vagrant. I would be happy to know more if
> you can tell me something
> 2 Thick knee but not sure about the specie. picture taken in the
> Kazinga channel Queen Elizabeth NP Uganda. Micol and me thought it
> was a Senegal Thick knee because of the facial markings. what do you
> think?
>
> have a great day
>
> Pietro
> Pietro Luraschi
> Safari Guide, Fgasa Level III

Wednesday, November 11, 2009

Sundry

TKS DAUDI, GREAT IMAGES AND, AS EVER, SAFI RECORDS.
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "David Peterson" <daudi@dorobo.co.tz>
> To: <tzbirdatlas@yahoo.co.uk>
> Sent: Monday, November 09, 2009 9:32 AM
> Subject: sundry
>
>
> > Back from 3 + weeks in the north with University group. The
> > persistence of the drought was pretty depressing - hard on people who
> > in turn are hard on the land and environment. Fortunately, the
> > drought seems to be breaking and el nino still predicted albeit
> > delayed.
> >
> > A few highlights:
> >
> > bearded scrub robin in Kiru valley at S 04.09 E 35.72 (just about
> > range limit) attached pics
>
> THIS IS WEST OF THE BABATI TO MAGUGU ROAD.
> >
> > brown backed woodpecker both in the Nou and Olorien (Loliondo)
> > forests
> >
> > olive flanked robin chat (mbuluensis) & orange ground thrush - Nou
> > forest
> >
> > Tullberg's woodpecker and purple - throated cuckooshrike Olorien
> > forest - attached pics
> >
> > Daudi
> >
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>

El Nino


> many tks Jo
>
> my earlier understanding of this was a "minor" event that would bring earlier and heavier rains.
>
> Iringa rains usually begin mid December, not yet sure if recent heavy rain is indicative of more to come.
>
> that note from Onesmo in the Selous is surely indicative of earlier than normal heavy rains. I recall staff needed to evacuate the Selous before mid February.
>
> Singida rains early and you guys up north doing rather well at the mo.
>
> the 97 / 98 event hit Tarangire just before Xmas.
>
> there are surely a range of web sites to check out, all it needs is for someone to break a leg and have time !!!!!!!!!
>
> whatever, it does look as though any inland waterbird counts in January will be pretty much a waste of time as they were in 98.
>
> Neil
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Jo Anderson
> To: TZ Bird Atlas
> Cc: Neil and Liz Baker Private
> Sent: Tuesday, November 10, 2009 8:15 AM
> Subject: El Nino
>
>
>
>
> I keep reading confused and badly researched articles relating to El Nino and its imminent arrival in East Africa. I cannot be sure whether it is the Tanzanian Met Office or just how their announcements are being reported, but it doesn't take much internet research to see that the assumption that an El Nino effect similar to that of 1997-98 is about to strike East Africa is doubtful if not downright wrong.
>
>
> As the selected paragraphs below show, El Nino events come at 2-7 year intervals, which is why we have already experienced an El Nino since the 1997-98 one; it was in 2006-07. We all remember those rains... especially if you were driving a Toyota (sorry couldn't resist!). What are referred to as "Major ENSO (El Nino Southern Oscillation) events" occur in periods of between every 10-50 years.
>
>
> Key to note here: second paragraph below, "An especially intense El Niño event in 1998 ".... Which puts the press reports about Moshi being washed away a la 1998 into perspective.
>
>
> People have short memories, except when it comes to extreme weather events, and in such cases their entire analysis of weather, climate and local conditions is biased.
>
>
> From our friends at Wikipedia....
>
>
> "The most recent occurrence of El Niño started in September 2006[33] and lasted until early 2007.[34] From June 2007 on, data indicated a moderate La Niña event, which strengthened in early 2008 and weakened by early 2009; the 2007-2008 La Niña event was the strongest since the 1988-1989 event. According to NOAA, El Niño conditions have been in place in the equatorial Pacific Ocean since June 2009. Therefore the 2009/2010 season is expected to be an El Niño year.[35]
>
>
> The major 1982-83 El Niño lead to an upsurge of interest from the scientific community. The period from 1990-1994 was unusual in that El Niños have rarely occurred in such rapid succession.[48] An especially intense El Niño event in 1998 caused an estimated 16% of the world?s reef systems to die. The event temporarily warmed air temperature by 1.5°C, compared to the usual increase of 0.25°C associated with El Niño events.[49] Since then, mass coral bleaching has become common worldwide, with all regions having suffered ?severe bleaching?.[50]
>
>
> Major ENSO events were recorded in the years 1790-93, 1828, 1876-78, 1891, 1925-26, 1972-73, 1982-83, and 1997-98.[36] Recent El Niños have occurred in 1986-1987, 1991-1992, 1993, 1994, 1997-1998, 2002-2003, 2004-2005 and 2006-2007."
>
>
> All good reasons to not put our faith in irregular and random weather events, but to start thinking about pro-actively facing up to and managing what we have around us. Time to stop spending time and money preparing to El Nino, which right now seems to be deflecting attention away from real every day issues.
>
>
> Jo.
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Jo Anderson MA (Oxon)
> Owner and Director
> Ecological Initiatives Ltd (formerly Oliver?s Camp Ltd)
> Arusha, Tanzania.
>
> email: jo@ei-tz.com
> Web page: www.ei-tz.com
> skype name: babasolomon
> Tel: +255 27 2509738
> Cell: +255 784 267205
>
> All the activities of Ecological Initiatives Ltd are carbon neutral. Emissions offset through our project Carbon Tanzania www.carbontanzania.com
>
>
>
>
> Ecological Initiatives supports Mkombozi Centre for Street Children. Mkombozi works with vulnerable children and young people in Tanzania. Mkombozi gives them a childhood. A future . An optional 1% can be donated through your invoice - thank you for your support (www.mkombozi.org )
>
>
> Neil and Liz Baker, Tanzania Bird Atlas, P.O. Box 1605, Iringa, Tanzania.
> Mobiles: 0776-360876 and 0776-360864.
> http://tanzaniabirdatlas.com
> Subscribe to: tanzaniabirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Re: mystery calls, high on Kilimanjaro

Hi guys. I wouldn't agree with Mocking Ciff-Chat, certainly not how they call here in the south at any rate. It sounds a lot like one of the contact calls of Cape Canary down here in South Africa. Listen to the Chappuis CD at about 30 seconds into the Cape Canary track and you will hear the sound I am referring to. So how about Yellow-crowned Canary? It is known from up to 4 000 m on Kili according to Zimmerman et al. My two cents worth. Warren
>
> --- In tanzaniabirds@yahoogroups.com, "HerMarc" <hermarc10@...> wrote:
> >
> > Hello Doug,
> >
> > I've been searching my own files, but cannot find this sound. Also on the CD's of Chappuis (African bird sounds) and of Gibbon (Southern African Bird sounds) I cannot find it so quickly. But if I remember well though from southeast Sudan, it is Mocking Cliff-chat (Myrmecocichla (Thamnolaea) cinnamomeiventris). It's a call, not a song.
> >
> > Wonder what others think.
> >
> > Greetings, Marc de Bont
> >
> >
> >
> > From: Doug Hardy
> > Sent: Monday, November 09, 2009 2:12 AM
> > To: tanzaniabirds@yahoogroups.com
> > Subject: [tanzaniabirds] mystery calls, high on Kilimanjaro
> >
> >
> >
> > Last month I briefly observed a small passerine within the crater of
> > Kilimanjaro, at ~5,700 m. Besides the White-naped Raven this is the only
> > bird I have seen at the summit, in 5+ weeks of time spent there
> > (cumulative).
> >
> > The following recordings were made during my brief glimpse of the bird
> > within an area of boulders. In so doing I was not able to make a careful
> > observation, and did not get any photos. Playback was not successful
> > because the bird departed as wind speed increased.
> >
> > Any ideas what species this might be?
> >
> > Thanks in advance for any thoughts-
> > Doug Hardy
> > Norwich Vermont, USA
> >
> > Two clips are available, each in wma or mp3 format:
> >
> > 11 seconds:
> > <http://www.geo.umass.edu/climate/tanzania/audio/kibobird49_42-53.wma>
> >
> > <http://www.geo.umass.edu/climate/tanzania/audio/kibobird49_42-53.mp3>
> >
> > 21 seconds:
> > <http://www.geo.umass.edu/climate/tanzania/audio/kibobird49_125-146.wma>
> >
> > <http://www.geo.umass.edu/climate/tanzania/audio/kibobird49_125-146.mp3>
> >
>
>

Secretary Bird

> Hello,
>
> Just saw a secretary bird 2 days ago in Mikumi.
>
> Best wishes,
>
> Roy
>
> Jan van den Hombergh wrote:
> > Neil, the morning thrush was nesting last weeks of August. Pics were from 5
> > September. Mud was taken I assumed from my flowerbeds, irregularly watered by
> > James.
> >
> > Jan
> >
> >
> >
> > _____
> >
> > From: tanzaniabirds@yahoogroups.com [mailto:tanzaniabirds@yahoogroups.com]
> > On Behalf Of tanzaniabirdatlas
> > Sent: Tuesday, October 13, 2009 10:20 AM
> > To: tanzaniabirds@yahoogroups.com
> > Subject: {Disarmed} [tanzaniabirds] Fw: Secretary Bird
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > thanks Graham, I must visit Dar more often to stir you out your slumber.
> >
> > only 3 records from Mikumi on our database so this is most welcome. would
> > love to know what "on & off" for 3 years really means in terms of dated
> > sightings.
> >
> > this is rather typical of a late dry season movement record even to Ruaha
> > (9)and Katavi (2).
> >
> > Neil
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Graham Mercer" <gmercer@istafrica. <mailto:gmercer%40istafrica.com>
> > com>
> > To: "tanzaniabirdatlas" <tzbirdatlas@ <mailto:tzbirdatlas%40yahoo.co.uk>
> > yahoo.co.uk>
> > Sent: Tuesday, October 13, 2009 8:57 AM
> > Subject: Secretary Bird
> >
> > Neil (and Liz!)
> >
> > As someone who has never risen above the mega-fauna stage into the rarified
> > air of the Serious Birder you will appreciate the cautionary approach that I
> >
> > here adopt, but I saw a Secretary Bird close to the Millennium Dam in Mikumi
> >
> > last Friday.
> >
> > This will have you and your extensive clan yawning (or muttering with
> > irritation) but in well over 100 visits to Mikumi (some of 7 -10 days) over
> > 32 years and at all times of year, I cannot remember having seen a Secretary
> >
> > Bird there before (my old note-books are back in England). It was stamping
> > all over grasshoppers (or whatever). Karen Oakes of the Fox Camp says it has
> >
> > been around, off and on, for about 3 years.
> >
> > Saw a few (about 4) European bee-eaters also - they are exquisite.
> >
> > And just in case you thought I was making a late-in-life attempt to be
> > welcomed as a fellow-birder, a most unexpected mammal emerged from the red
> > oat grassland at 8.15 one night and trotted blithely past the dining tent -
> > Canis domesticus (or familiaris or lupus familiaris, take your pick). It was
> >
> > not seen again - the resident leopard had been padding around that same
> > track the previous night.
> >
> > Take care -
> >
> > Graham
> > Neil and Liz Baker, Tanzania Bird Atlas, P.O. Box 1605, Iringa, Tanzania.
> > Mobiles: 0776-360876 and 0776-360864.
> > http://tanzaniabird <http://tanzaniabirdatlas.com> atlas.com
> > Subscribe to: tanzaniabirds-
> > <mailto:tanzaniabirds-subscribe%40yahoogroups.com> subscribe@yahoogroups.com
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
> --
>
> Roy J. Hinde M.Sc.
> Marketing Director
> Wild Things Safaris Ltd.
> roy@wildthingsafaris.com
> www.wildthingsafaris.com

Mystery calls, high on Kilimanjaro

> Last month I briefly observed a small passerine within the crater of
> Kilimanjaro, at ~5,700 m. Besides the White-naped Raven this is the only
> bird I have seen at the summit, in 5+ weeks of time spent there
> (cumulative).
>
> The following recordings were made during my brief glimpse of the bird
> within an area of boulders. In so doing I was not able to make a careful
> observation, and did not get any photos. Playback was not successful
> because the bird departed as wind speed increased.
>
> Any ideas what species this might be?
>
> Thanks in advance for any thoughts-
> Doug Hardy
> Norwich Vermont, USA
>
> Two clips are available, each in wma or mp3 format:
>
> 11 seconds:
> <http://www.geo.umass.edu/climate/tanzania/audio/kibobird49_42-53.wma>
>
> <http://www.geo.umass.edu/climate/tanzania/audio/kibobird49_42-53.mp3>
>
> 21 seconds:
> <http://www.geo.umass.edu/climate/tanzania/audio/kibobird49_125-146.wma>
>
> <http://www.geo.umass.edu/climate/tanzania/audio/kibobird49_125-146.mp3>
>

Video on the Poisoning of Lions in Kenya

Dear all

I've just completed this slideshow on youtube and hope you will view it and leave a comment. Please circulate widely.

http://baraza.wildlifedirect.org/2009/11/10/the-poisoning-of-kenyas-lions/
Kind regards
> Paula
>
> Dear all,
>
> According to the Daily Nation a 3 year old child in Kitale ingested a little Furadan and died 10 minutes later.
>
> This story is covered in a double page spread in the Daily Nation on Features pg 20
>
> We are trying to verify that it was actually Furadan from the hospital and doctors as well as family.

Sunday, November 8, 2009

White-throated bee-eaters

John Dixon just (14:35 8 Nov) rushed in waving his arms about, flock of 7 or 8 just arrived.
>
> another one to submit all dated records for.
>
> a quite recent addition to the Zambian list so we can expect numbers further south in Tanzania than the literature suggests.
>
> Neil
>
> Neil and Liz Baker, Tanzania Bird Atlas, P.O. Box 1605, Iringa, Tanzania.
> Mobiles: 0776-360876 and 0776-360864.
> http://tanzaniabirdatlas.com
> Subscribe to: tanzaniabirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Migrants in Dar

> tks Andy
>
> check out these Mad bee-eaters, Blue-cheeked will be arriving about now !!!!
>
> JD thinks these at Jangwani are B-cB.
>
> Liz had Spotted Flycatcher at Jangwani Beach 2 days ago, it's still here.
>
> More Heuglin's Gulls and Sooty Gulls around this past week.
>
> Golden Orioles in the garden most days.
>
> Neil
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: andrew perkin
> To: Neil Baker
> Sent: Friday, November 06, 2009 3:06 PM
>
>
> Migrants now arriving in Valhala
>
> Sat 31 garden warbler
> Sun 1 Golden orioles
> Tues 3 Ist Madagascar bee eaters. Aso possible barn swallows.
>
> Andy
>
>
> -----------------------------
> c/o TFCG, P.O. Box 23410,
> Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
> Tel. Mobile: +255 765 634 820
>
>
>
>
> Neil and Liz Baker, Tanzania Bird Atlas, P.O. Box 1605, Iringa, Tanzania.
> Mobiles: 0776-360876 and 0776-360864.
> http://tanzaniabirdatlas.com
> Subscribe to: tanzaniabirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

3-year old died -WildlifeDirect appeals to Kenyan PM to ban carbofuran after 3 year old dies

THIS NASTY IS WIDELY USED IN TANZANIA.

> DO WE HAVE AN NGO TO TAKE UP THIS CAUSE ?
>
> DO TPRI HAVE A STATEMENT TO MAKE ON THIS PRODUCT ? JAMES MATEE, ANY COMMENT.
>
> Neil
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> Sent: Saturday, November 07, 2009 12:36 AM
> Subject: Fwd: WildlifeDirect appeals to Kenyan PM to ban carbofuran after 3
> year old dies
From: Paula Kahumbu <paula@wildlifedirect.org>
> > Date: Fri, 6 Nov 2009 20:05:18 +0300
> > Subject: WildlifeDirect appeals to Kenyan PM to ban carbofuran after 3
> > year old dies
> > To: Peter Greste >
> > Dear Friends,
> >
> > With the final revokation of carbofuran in USA by the American
> > Environmental
> > Protection Agency even Kenyas exports like coffee will be banned. As you
> > may
> > know carbofuran is sold as Furadan in Kenya and East Africa, but is
> > manufactured in USA where it's use has been banned as it is too hazardous
> > to
> > workers, consumers and the environment.
> >
> > This email explains why Kenya must follow suit to save much more than our
> > lions, it is for the benefit of farmers, farm productivity, families,
> > horticultural consumers, export business and our natural ecosystems.
> > Please
> > circulate widely to contacts in medical, veterinary, wildlife,
> > agriculture,
> > tourism and public health,
> >
> > Kind regards
> >
> > Paula Kahumbu
> >
> > Kenya's Prime Minister Urged to Help Ban Carbofuran
> > Nairobi, 06 November 2009 - On Friday, 30 October 2009, the US
> > Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that it would implement
> > the
> > agency's May 2009 final rule revoking all tolerances, or residue limits,
> > for
> > the pesticide carbofuran. From 31 December 2009, therefore, any use of
> > carbofuran in USA becomes a crime punishable with fines and jail
> > sentences.
> > Kenyan conservationists now want their government to follow suit and
> > impose
> > a total ban on carbofuran in the country.
> >
> > Conservationists, led by the Nairobi-based NGO, WildlifeDirect, want the
> > support of their Prime Minister, Raila Odinga, who on Monday, 2 November
> > 2009, adopted a lion under the Kenya Wildlife Service's (KWS) Wildlife
> > Endowment Fund. It is a rare conservation gesture coming from one so high
> > in Kenya's political pyramid.
> >
> > WildlifeDirect and its partners have been calling for a total ban on
> > carbofuran in Kenya for about two years and they now see hope in the Prime
> > Minister's small but important gesture of adopting a lion - a species
> > imperiled by this lethal poison. "Mr Odinga should now lead parliament in
> > realizing the ban on this number one lion-killer." says Dr Paula Kahumbu,
> > Executive Director of WildlifeDirect.
> >
> > Carbofuran, known in Kenya by its brand name- Furadan, which is
> > manufactured
> > by the FMC Corporation of Philadelphia, USA and is solely distributed in
> > Kenya (and the rest of East Africa) by Juanco Limited - is known to have
> > killed at least 76 lions in 5 years. Carbofuran is also responsible for
> > the
> > deaths of more than 300 vultures, and truckloads of other birds and
> > animals
> > according to scientists and the KWS.
> >
> > Reports of human death due to carbofuran poisoning have emerged.
> > WildlifeDirect spoke on phone with the heartbroken father of a child who
> > died of Furadan poisoning. The report of this death first appeared on
> > Kenya's The Standard newspaper on Friday, 30 October 2009 saying that on
> > Monday, 26 October 2009, the child had mistakenly ingested Furadan and
> > died.
> >
> > The child's father informed WildlifeDirect that the child died on arrival
> > at
> > the Cherangani Nursing Home in Trans Nzoia East District in western Kenya.
> > The father had bought the pesticide four months ago for use in killing
> > insects in the soil when preparing his vegetable nursery. He says that he
> > was not aware how dangerous the product is and was not informed by the
> > retailer about the first aid approach in case of pesticide ingestion. He
> > gave his child milk and crushed eggs - a method of dealing with poisoning
> > widely used in Africa - instead of water as the label says.
> >
> > This confirms that this poison is critically dangerous for Africans even
> > those with sufficient levels of education like the bereaved man who is a
> > teacher at a local primary school. The lack of the clear and utterly
> > off-putting universal symbol of death - the skull and crossbones - dupes
> > end
> > users of the pesticide into thinking that its poisoning effects are mild.
> >
> > The damage that carbofuran has caused to wildlife, the environment and
> > humans is not unique to Kenya. Of the EPA's 3 year determination, Steve
> > Owens, the assistant administrator for EPA's Office said that "The
> > evidence
> > is clear that carbofuran does not meet today's rigorous food-safety
> > standards."
> >
> > "If the pesticide is not safe for use in the US or Europe, where pesticide
> > users are more informed, why would we think that the pesticide is safe for
> > use in Africa?" asks Dr Richard Leakey, Chairman of WildlifeDirect.
> >
> > This pesticide was developed for largely literate and highly regulated
> > developed countries. In Africa, where most farmers are uneducated and
> > where
> > the regulatory bodies are under-resourced, users are exposed to greater
> > danger. The product is often repackaged in small, affordable but unmarked
> > packets that have no user instructions. "It is immoral to sell a pesticide
> > as dangerous as carbofuran in Africa" Dr Leakey adds.
> >
> > It gets worse for Kenya which is a large exporter of coffee to the US. Dr
> > Michael Fry of the American Bird Conservancy says, "The revocation of all
> > food tolerances has international implications, as imports of rice,
> > coffee,
> > bananas and sugarcane were previously allowed to contain residues of
> > carbofuran." He adds, "After this revocation, countries wishing to export
> > these foods to the US must stop using carbofuran on these four major
> > crops."
> >
> >
> > Dr Leakey, who has been central to the call to ban this lethal poison,
> > urges
> > Mr Odinga to act now to stop this carnage. "The Prime Minister did well to
> > adopt that young lion cub, but now is the time for him to lead in a much
> > more significant action to save lions - declare them an endangered species
> > in Kenya and enforce a total ban on carbofurans" he says.
> >
> > This, according to WildlifeDirect, must be coupled with proper management
> > of
> > lions, compensation for depredation of livestock, incentives and rewards
> > for
> > communities and land owners to protect lions, plus effective enforcement
> > by
> > the wildlife authorities. These actions could bring the lion back from the
> > brink of national extinction and restore the pride to Kenya's national
> > symbol.
> > WildlifeDirect is a non-profit conservation organization based in Kenya
> > that uses the internet to create awareness about conservation issues and
> > to
> > raise funds for conservation through Web Logs (blogs) written by field
> > conservationists. WildlifeDirect endeavors to create a movement powerful
> > enough to produce a virtual endowment capable of reversing the
> > catastrophic
> > loss of habitats and species. WildlifeDirect is Registered as a charity in
> > the USA and in Kenya.
>
> >
> > For more information and pictures (of poisoned lions) contact:
> > Samuel Maina maina@wildlifedirect.org
>
> > Paula Kahumbu
> > Executive Director WildlifeDirect
> > P.O. Box 24467 Nairobi
> > Kenya
> > cel + 254 722 685 106
> >
> > Raise money for http://wildlifedirect.org
> > just by searching the Internet with http://www.goodsearch.com
>

Mouse-coloured Sunbird in Dar es Salaam

Hi all
>
> Liz found a Mouse-coloured Sunbird in John Dixon's garden at Jangwani Beach. As you can see from the attached list of records for Dar square this bird has become increasingly rare. No doubt due to the attentions of our not so friendly House Crows.
>
> This bird is frequenting a loranthus (and no doubt contributing to its pollination) in a non native tree. A Red-fronted Tinkerbird is on hand to disperse the seeds.
>
> A bird to look out for... not keen on changing the name to Grey Sunbird... more than enough boring names out there these days !!
>
> Neil
>
> Neil and Liz Baker, Tanzania Bird Atlas, P.O. Box 1605, Iringa, Tanzania.
> Mobiles: 0776-360876 and 0776-360864.
> http://tanzaniabirdatlas.com
> Subscribe to: tanzaniabirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Campethera Woodpecker - Katavi



> Adam
>
> This is really interesting, away from home at the mo, no books to hand, need to check Short, Woodpeckers of the World as well as BoA and the Helm guide.
>
> If it's not an odd Golden-tailed an isolated race of Nubian would be more likely than an isolated race of Speckle-throated (on biogeographical grounds). You are quite correct that Golden-tailed (abingoni, all races) is streaked below. Don't pay any attention to the "golden tail", they all have this.
>
> Good for everyone to check what serious books they have.
>
> Neil
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Adam Kennedy
> To: Neil and Liz Baker ; tanzaniabirds@yahoogroups.com
> Sent: Friday, November 06, 2009 7:11 PM
> Subject: Campethera Woodpecker - Katavi
>
>
> Hi Neil et al.,
In addition to the other goodies on show in camp today was a Campethera woodpecker sp., see images attached.
While I?m happy that it is just a Golden-tailed Woodpecker, a species which I commonly see in camp, I just wanted to gauge the feeling among the other members of the group as it shows some unusual spotting on the chest and belly where one would normally expect streaking ? which is supposedly the classic ID feature for this species.
Looking at image 1, the bird shows the classic face pattern of black throat with white speckles, thus ruling out Bennet?s, Nubian, Mombasa and Speckle-throated. Ear coverts appear mostly plain. The black forecrown peppered white and red hindcrown indicate female, or possibly immature. All fine. But images 2 and 3 show that the belly and chest are in fact spotted rather than streaked. I wonder if this is simply a strongly marked immature bird?
>
>
>
> If so, I wonder if such woodpeckers may have been mis-identified in Katavi as Nubian, which is on the park list but which I am yet to encounter in the main tourist square and which I would expect to occur in drier habitats (like Ruaha) that we tend to have here?
>
>
>
> Cheers for now,
>
>
>
> Adam
>
>
>
> Neil and Liz Baker, Tanzania Bird Atlas, P.O. Box 1605, Iringa, Tanzania.
> Mobiles: 0776-360876 and 0776-360864.
> http://tanzaniabirdatlas.com
> Subscribe to: tanzaniabirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Latest on Katavi sunbird [2 Attachments]

Latest on Katavi sunbird [2 Attachments]
>
> tks Adam
>
>
> with no yellow on view this does look good for Mariqua..........an aberrant individual ??? what birds is it associating with ? any females ? what sunbirds is it interacting with ? defending flowers against who ?
>
> Neil
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Adam Kennedy
> To: tanzaniabirds@yahoogroups.com ; Neil and Liz Baker
> Sent: Friday, November 06, 2009 7:00 PM
> Subject: Latest on Katavi sunbird
>
>
> Hi Neil et al.,
>
>
>
> Our sunbird didn?t fancy having his photo taken much today so just some poor quality crops from afar but hopefully you will be able to see some of his newer features, namely;
>
>
>
> *An incredibly blue iridescence to his back and collar
>
> * Reduced vibrance of yellow patches but these have been extending down the flanks.
>
>
>
> As per Marc?s suggestion, I?m also trying to get close enough to record the voice but I?m having to use a camera to do so and it?s not quite happening for me. Will continue to try though.
>
>
>
> Cheers
>
>
>
> Adam
>
> Neil and Liz Baker, Tanzania Bird Atlas, P.O. Box 1605, Iringa, Tanzania.
> Mobiles: 0776-360876 and 0776-360864.
> http://tanzaniabirdatlas.com
> Subscribe to: tanzaniabirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Purple-crested Turaco


tks Adam, neat pic.
>
> This species was included in a mid 90s review of "Red Data birds in East Africa" written by Kenyans with no knowledge at all of Tanzania other than old literature.
>
> This species is common and widespread throughout both the eastern and western Miombo belts. Still doing rather well and, as long as our larger GRs remain intact this bird will be fine, well into the foreseeable future.
>
> latest map soon, have to get home first...................
>
> Neil
>
> Hi All,

While failing to stalk our odd sunbird successfully today I happened on some good luck with one of our resident Purple-crested Turacos. Usually our birds are not approachable but perseverance paid off today and I just wanted to share my luck with the group.
I hope you like it.
Best wishes,
Adam

Common Redstart in Katavi today [3 Attachments]


> From: tanzaniabirdatlas [tzbirdatlas@yahoo.co.uk]
> Sent: 2009-11-08 08:50:20 CET
> To: tanzaniabirds@yahoogroups.com
> Subject: [tanzaniabirds] Fw: Common Redstart in Katavi today [3 Attachments]
>
> this is quite a wow bird this far south. not sure it is even on the Zambian list. we only have 3 confirmed / good records on the Atlas database but for sure it is overlooked and, esp in the NW, simply missed due lack of observers.
>
> Zul, I recall an obs of yours ? Naabi Hill ??? it's not in our database !!!!
>
> there are several other claims, usually by European or American birders unfamiliar with our Familiar Chat !!!! some might be genuine but most obvious ID errors (i.e. they did not include Familiar Chat in their list and the habitat is good / quite OK for this rather widespread and often low density species)
>
> Neil
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Adam Kennedy
> To: Neil and Liz Baker ; tanzaniabirds@yahoogroups.com
> Sent: Friday, November 06, 2009 7:08 PM
> Subject: Common Redstart in Katavi today
>
>
>
>
> Hi Neil et al.,
>
>
>
> Close views of a Common Redstart in camp today, probably a first-year bird on account of the clean plumage and very pale edge to greater coverts. Find some mediocre images attached that hopefully show this.
>
>
>
> I gather from F&S that this species is rarely encountered in southern TZ so hopefully this is a good record for you Neil?
>
>
>
> Also 2 Sedge Warbler and my first Levaillant?s Cuckoo of the season in camp today.
>
>
>
> Cheers and best
>
>
>
> Adam
>
> Neil and Liz Baker, Tanzania Bird Atlas, P.O. Box 1605, Iringa, Tanzania.
> Mobiles: 0776-360876 and 0776-360864.
> http://tanzaniabirdatlas.com
> Subscribe to: tanzaniabirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Locations points for a Lappet Faced Vultures

> From: tanzaniabirdatlas [tzbirdatlas@yahoo.co.uk]
> Sent: 2009-11-08 06:32:10 CET
> To: tanzaniabirds@yahoogroups.com
> Subject: [tanzaniabirds] Fw: locations points for a Lappet Faced Vultures
>
> anyone in the Serengeti able to get to this location point please do so.
>
> it's in the Western Corridor, west of Kirawira 2 Special Camp and south of the road (I think).
>
> Neil
>
> Munir, any website URL for this tracking ?
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Munir Virani
> To: tzbirdatlas@yahoo.co.uk
> Cc: Corinne Kendall ; granthopcraft@fzs.org
> Sent: Saturday, November 07, 2009 7:05 AM
> Subject: locations points for a Lappet Faced Vultures
>
>
> Dear Neil:
>
>
> Would you please pass this information to the TZ Birds Net Group. Corinne Kendall who is doing a study on vultures using GSM-GPS units has a last reading for a Lappet on 4th September in the Serengeti at the following location 34.32314046224 -2.1670397440592
>
>
>
> Either the unit has failed or the bird maybe dead or just out of range. We would like to confirm. We would appreciate it if anyone in the Serengeti would check up this area and perhaps look for a unit, or any evidence.
>
>
> Thanks,
>
>
> Munir
>
>
> PS Other birds are flying really well and covering huge distances.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Munir Z. Virani, PhD
>
>
> Africa Program Director
> The Peregrine Fund
> 5668 West Flying Hawk Lane
> Boise Idaho 83709
> USA
>
>
> Current Address:
> Ornithology Section
> National Museum of Kenya
> P.O Box 45111
> Nairobi Kenya 00100
> Tel +254-733-748922 (cell)
>
>
> www.peregrinefund.org
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Neil and Liz Baker, Tanzania Bird Atlas, P.O. Box 1605, Iringa, Tanzania.
> Mobiles: 0776-360876 and 0776-360864.
> http://tanzaniabirdatlas.com
> Subscribe to: tanzaniabirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Friday, November 6, 2009

Euro Rollers and Euro Hobby in Katavi today

Hi All,
>
> My first European Rollers for the season were seen this morning - six together just outside camp. and a Eurasian Hobby hawking outside the office just now.
>
> Cheers
> Adam

ps - our odd sunbird is moulting into a more adult plumage but still with a flush of yellow on chest and now flanks. Will try for more pics tomorrow.

Wednesday, November 4, 2009

Rufous Chatterer in the Selous

> Hi Onesmo
>
> Not at home so no books with me.
>
> Rufous Chatterer occurs along the coast near Dar so could well just about
> reach the Selous.
>
> Need to check Birds of Africa for details of coastal race. imm birds may
> well have dark eyes.
>
> Paul, you online at home, can you check this race for Onesmo.
>
> More soon, when time to check.
>
> Neil
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Onesmo Jacob" <onesmojacob@gmail.com>
> To: "tanzaniabirdatlas" <tzbirdatlas@yahoo.co.uk>
> Sent: Tuesday, November 03, 2009 12:04 PM
>
>
> > Hi Neil Sacha saw Rufous Chatterer along the Beho Beho river.
> > Isnot a common one around is may be the second sight we have had for
> > the last fiveyears.
> > The strange thing is the colour of the eyes which is dark instead of pale.
> > Any comment on this?
> > onesmo.
> Neil and Liz Baker, Tanzania Bird Atlas, P.O. Box 1605, Iringa, Tanzania.
> Mobiles: 0776-360876 and 0776-360864.
> http://tanzaniabirdatlas.com
> Subscribe to: tanzaniabirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
>

blue swallow

Dear Liz & Neil

Mark just rang to say he saw a Female Blue Swallow at Ungars Bridge this morning.

Shanna

Monday, November 2, 2009

Secretary Bird Mikumi

Secretary Bird
>
> another record from Mikumi, most probably the same bird. could well be a
> regular dry season visitor.
>
> thanks Martin, some records from you please....................... THEY ALL
> COUNT.
>
> Neil
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Martin Perks" 27, 2009 11:44 AM
> Subject: Secretary Bird
>
>
> > Hi Neil
> >
> > Secretary Bird at Mikumi also sighted by one of our friends about 1km from
> > the Millennium Dam (coming from the main entrance) on 21st Sept,
> >
> > All the best,
> >
> > Martin

Uhehe Fiscal on nest


Uhehe Fiscal
These may well be the first ever photos of chicks in the nest for this Southern Highlands endemic.
>
> David, Leo, just a reminder that photos as they grow older would be good and esp pics after they leave the nest.
>
> Nice one.
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: liz baker
> To: tzbirdatlas@yahoo.co.uk
> Sent: Sunday, November 01, 2009 7:54 AM
> Subject: Fwd: Uhehe Fiscal
>
>
>
>
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: David Lloyd-Jones <dlloydjones@gmail.com>
> Date: Wed, Oct 28, 2009 at 10:30 AM
> Subject: Uhehe Fiscal
> To: tzbakers <tzbakers@gmail.com>
>
>
>
> Hope these are satisfactory. No doubt Leons has let you know the other data, I have other photos at different angles if needed.
> Leons and I got them yesterday and in addition saw another Uhehe at a different location.
> The insect was a grasshopper but also chicks were fed a groundworm.
> Saw both male and female together at nest and there was very little discernible difference in the short time they were together.
> Cheers
>
>
>
> Neil and Liz Baker, Tanzania Bird Atlas, P.O. Box 1605, Iringa, Tanzania.
> Mobiles: 0776-360876 and 0776-360864.
> http://tanzaniabirdatlas.com
> Subscribe to: tanzaniabirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Long-legged Buzzard in Ruaha NP

Long-legged Buzzard in Ruaha NP
>
> A call just in from Rob Glen. An adult Long-legged Buzzard low over his camp this morning.
>
> and a pause while writing this as we watch a pale phase Booted Eagle being mobbed by House Crows over Kunduchi.
>
> Neil
> Neil and Liz Baker, Tanzania Bird Atlas, P.O. Box 1605, Iringa, Tanzania.
> Mobiles: 0776-360876 and 0776-360864.
> http://tanzaniabirdatlas.com
> Subscribe to: tanzaniabirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com